Rosemary #4 – Digestive Aid

rosemary 4

 

Rosemary is added to our cuisine for more than gustatory pleasure. It can actually improve our digestion of starches and vegetables, relieve an upset stomach and halt flatulence. Rosemary’s constituents,  caffeic acid and rosmarinic acid act as antioxidants and anti-inflammatories which will go to work in the digestive system right away.

If you consider the energetics of Rosemary, as a warming, stimulating herb, you’ll easily associate it with the type of digestive issues its most suited to: cold digestive issues. These generally manifest as a lack of appetite, bloating, gas, and constipation.

I especially like it combined with Oregon Grape Root for the liver issues, and is additionally helpful in a pattern that often includes excessive, dilute urination from kidney deficiency and low blood pressure as well as inability to digest protein/fat efficiently.

A More Efficient Liver with Rosemary

Anything that can reduce the strain on the liver in its efforts to clear the body of toxins is an important ally, especially when a liver becomes sluggish. Researchers at National Institute of Agronomic Research in Dijon, France, discovered that Rosemary actually boosts the activity of detoxifying enzymes like cytochrome P450, glutathione transferase and quinone reductase , speeding up the elimination of toxins from the liver.

Kiva Rose writes,

I especially like it combined with Oregon Grape Root for the liver issues, and is additionally helpful in a pattern that often includes excessive, dilute urination from kidney deficiency and low blood pressure as well as inability to digest protein/fat efficiently.

Rosemary also helps by stimulating the flow of bile.

Back to energetics. Peter Holmes enlists Rosemary for the following energetically defined conditions:

Intestines (spleen) damp cold: indigestion, cold limbs, gurgling abdomen, loose mucousy stools

CHRONIC GASTROENTERITIS; colitis

Liver cold; right flank soreness, alternating constipation and diarrhea, frontal headache, chills

JAUNDICE, CHOLECYSTITIS, liver cirrhosis, gallstones due to damp or cold

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About dcoda

An herbalist for over 40 years, ten years spent alone in the Ozark Hurricane Creek Wilderness Preserve, working with its brilliant botanicals. I'm an instructor and co-founder of the Ozark Herbal Academy which offers training in medicinal and edible plants through hands-on workshops and online courses.

Posted on November 22, 2014, in Medicinal Herbs and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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